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? >> chris, there's a lot of technological advances from the old days of, you know, the mugshot photo book. certainly there's facial recognition software. all of those techniques, you know, advanced techniques will be used in this case. and i agree with the other comments made that it's not going to take long for somebody to recognize these people. >> yeah, there's an interesting database, chris, ever since 2003, we've been taking photographs and digital fingerprints of people coming into this country under u.s. visit. i think there are over 80 million digital photographs there. i just don't know. maybe one of your guests will tell whether or not the fbi -- >> how many? >> 80 million. everybody who's come across at an airport internationally, we have fingerprints and a digital photograph. >> everyone who has gone internationally -- >> no, everybody who's come into the united states. >> as a visitor. >> as a visitor. under u.s. visit. we got their digital photograph and we have their -- a couple fingerpri fingerprints. >> wouldn't they match that up if they have these visual images? >> i do
to our critical infrastructure. >> how do you work to prevent this? >> we have technology, cyber technologies, prevention technologies. we spend a lot of time now on technologies.
time, you could argue that it means a decrease in personnel. because you're using technology, using cameras to replace, you know, eyeballs. but i don't think we've come to that determination. we're down -- the police department is down 6,000 police officers than where we were 11 years ago. so we've already sort of paid the price. and we're using to a certain extent technology to plug the gaps. we're increasing the number of cameras that we have. one of the things that we're doing, we had it in motion prior to the boston marathon. but we want to increase the number of mobile cameras that we have so we can put them up at events and then move them to other events. along our marathon route, we have 220 cameras. but most of them are on bridges. we want to increase at least the public sector cameras that we have along that route. >> all right. new york city police commissioner, ray kelly, thank you very much. it's always good to see you. >> thank you for the great job you keep doing for the city. >> thank you. >>> a new book on afghanistan that's not so good. president hamid karzai had to
the door for this, but this is why i answer the way i did that i see that with the technology goings way it is and with drone technology advancing and drones getting smaller and smaller, they are not going to the the giant, big predators flying over pakistan, but little small drones to be armed with things. this is not science fiction here in terms of this is actually happening. >> booktv on location on the campus of the university of southern california at the l.a. times festival of books talking with mark mazzetti, "new york times" national security correspondent and author of this book, "the way of the knife," and, jim, you're the next caller from idaho. hi, jim. >> caller: good afternoon, gentlemen. i have a question. the la proider of servicee of to the war department in afghanistan, and i asked how the afghans were going, and i quoted him in the remark right now saying that it's basically a total failure. he went into details about that aspect of what basic means. what do you think the result is basically in afghanistan? >> well, it's obviously a question on a lot of people's mind.
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4